Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 12th International Conference on Clinical Research & Clinical Trials Zurich, Switzerland.

Day 1 :

  • Clinical Trails and Innovation | Future of Clinical Trials | Clinical Trials in Cardiology and Neurology | Pharmacovigilance and Drug Safety | Oncology Clinical Research
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Rawan Tafish graduated from Beirut Arab University with a Bachelor of Pharmacy (BSc) degree in year 2012, then she joined the post-graduate program and earned the Doctor of Pharmacy degree in year 2014. She was interested in joining a distance learning program in Notting Hill College, UK from which she earned the Post Graduate Diploma in Clinical Pharmacy (PGDipClinPhar) in year 2019. Dr. Tafish is an SCFHS certified clinical pharmacist since year 2014, a member of the Saudi Society of clinical Pharmacy SSCP, and she has been working as a clinical pharmacist in Kingdom Hospital & Consulting Clinics, Riyadh since year 2015. To date, she has been working in various inpatient wards, particularly the critically-ill patient units, and she has been recognized as an active member in several scientific commitees and the Co-chairman of the Antimicrobial Stewardship committee. Dr. Tafish has participated in several CME-accredited conferences and workshops, and she is interested in scientific research for which she has conducted clinical studies in the fields of ‘Infectious Diseases’ and ‘Critical Care’.

Abstract:

The risk of surgical site infections (SSIs), particularly methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) SSIs, post spinal surgeries is one of the most daunting experiences to patients and surgeons. In some practices, vancomycin powder is applied directly on the wound before skin closure to minimize the risk of SSIs; however, this practice is not supported by well-established evidence. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the hospital database. Patients who underwent spinal surgeries from the period of 09/2013 to 09/2019 were included and followed up to 30 days (surgeries without implantation) or 90 days (with implantation). The odds ratio (OR) of the first SSI observed in the follow-up period between vancomycin users vs. non-users was estimated using logistic regression adjusting for the measured confounders. A sensitivity analysis was conducted using a propensity score analysis. We included 81 vancomycin users vs. 375 non-users with 28 infections. The adjusted OR of SSIs between the two groups was 0.40 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.11 to 1.34). The result of the propensity score analysis was consistent (OR: 0.97 [95% CI 0.35 to 2.68]). 

We could not find a lower association of SSIs with intra-wound vancomycin in patients who underwent spinal surgeries. Conducting larger multicenter studies would add more emphasis to findings of this study

Biography:

Dr. Bhavna Anand (PT) is currently working as a Teaching Associate in Amity Institute of Physiotherapy, Amity University, Noida, Uttar Pradesh, India.  She is a firm believer that knowledge and skills are constantly upgraded which makes her use latest methodologies to impart education among the students in subjects like Anatomy, exercise therapy, microbiology as theoretical and practical subjects. She believes in teaching from heart and being a leader to the students. She wants to show them that, teaching brings her joy.

Dr. Bhavna has completed B.P.T and MPT from Amity College of Physiotherapy and currently working to complete her PhD from Amity University, Noida.  She has over 10 years of experience working as a clinician in various hospitals of Delhi and NCR region like Mata Gujri, Swami Dayanand hospital, Edens hospital and many more. Being a young researcher she has published over 10 research papers in different journals with a wide area of research including cancer, musculoskeletal disorders, and mental stress.

Abstract:

Cancer is not only the challenging disease but the treatment is so the same. Chemotherapy is the treatment plan that is included as an essential treatment which increases the chances to live in serious cancer stages and their types but chemotherapy induced cardiac dysfunction is the life-threatening complications leading to electrophysiological dysfunctions presented at Electrocardiogram. Studies have presented that Chemotherapy is the cause around 5% of cardiac-toxicities and near 4% the reason of cardiac death in cancer. This study aims to review the literature behind the effect of chemotherapy on the electrocardiogram and its alterations see at various stages and types of cancer. The methodology focused by studying the research literature with the help of the keywords and extracted the data from Google scholars, PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane and had 12060 articles in last 5 years. The articles were further investigated on the basis of inclusion criteria including ECG, no history of cardiac abnormalities, Chemotherapy and Cancer with there stages. 51 articles were left behind after investigation and resulted on ECG parameters as waves, complex and interval and alteration; consisting of different types of drugs, stages and type of cancer. Various alterations on ECG parameters that were QTc prolongation, abnormal ventricular repolarization, increased heart rate, QRS complex abnormalities and the severity to the disease was seen in the increased in stage of cancer as early the cardiac toxicity was noticed and delayed in early cancer diagnosis.

Keywords: Electrocardiogram, Chemotherapy, Stages of cancer

Speaker
Biography:

Elteleb Gafer Elnaim Abdullah has registered his PhD in the University of Khartoum at the age of 30 years at October/2018 He is the head department of haematology.

Abstract:

Background: The malaria parasite (sporozoite) infect a human after biting by infected female anopheles mosquito, the erythrocyte which develop of normoblast finally developed to mature erythrocytes, the malaria parasites (P. falciparum and P. vivax ) most common endemically in Khartoum. Aim: A study was aimed to investigate the association of malaria parasite density with three biomarkers (thrombocytopenia, urine malaria antigens, and ABO & RhD groups).

Methods: A gold standard thick blood film to demonstrate a malaria stained using Gaimsa stain, a density of malaria expressed by number of crosses, then by immune-chromatography test (ICT) to detect malaria antigens according to species from urine deposit, the platelets was estimated by automated haematology analyser (Sysmex KX21 & Mindray) and peripheral blood picture to assess and confirm the platelets count, the ABO and RhD were detected using simple slid method and direct tube method to confirm results, the data were analyzed using SPSS version 22 and the statistical significant was expressed in P value < 0.05. Results: In 63 malaria patients with irrespective to age, the density of malaria parasite show 39 (+), 16 (++) and 8 (+++) respectively, there were significant associations of malaria parasite density (+++) with thrombocytopenia and urine malaria antigens P. value 0.000, 0.004 respectively and insignificancy in (ABO & RhD) and malaria parasite density the P. value 0.959.

Conclusion: A present finding explicit both thrombocytopenia, and urine malaria antigens may associate with high malaria parasite density, but insignificancy association of ABO, RhD phenotypes with density of malaria parasites.